Here Comes The Neighborhood

Gates and fences, as has been said, and as is quite obvious, started and often remain an element directed at security. The idea of keeping people out, except those the property-owner desires to enter, goes back to the very first fences, walls, and gates. But security comes in many colors, not the least of which is the idea of community. We would be correct to assume that physical security measures pre-date the security imposed by laws and the penalties that attach to their violation. But law, and the resultant cultures that are shaped by laws, have slowly, and in fits and starts, altered community itself, and all it implies and imparts.

 

Criminal acts will, sadly, be with us forever. But the numbers and nature of such acts have in some places diminished with time, and in other places shifted locations of greatest impact. Rural settings have markedly different crime rates as well as crime types. Cities also differ from each other based on a myriad of local factors – climate, local law and law enforcement efforts; cultural pressures; and most of all, community involvement. The more involved the community members are with life in their community, especially outside their own homes, where their physical visibility, and the visibility of their interactions with their neighbors, the less likely their neighborhood will be targeted by criminal elements.

 

It is within such neighborhoods that the nature of fences and gates change from pure physical barriers and access controls, to architectural complements to the home enclosed by them. This sort of change might seem subtle, but only due to how these elements support each others esthetics. Instead of relying on pure physical impermeability as their deterrence value, they rely on the historic mental image of a fence and gate as an unconscious reminder. Such fences and gates tell the passer-by to respect the property limits, while also relying on the pleasure of seeing an esthetically balanced view to engage that same passer-by in a different perspective – one of community, of neighborhood, of friendly people and places. By effecting a change in mind-set, one also reinforces the lowering of criminal intent by replacing it with a sense of belonging. Now, certainly this does not mean a total reduction in criminal behavior – the human species will always have its ner-do-well’s and miscreants. But these more subtle contributors to better security should not be under-valued: they represent a slow but historic shift in the evolution of communities.

 

So the next time you take a walk in the neighborhood, look at the fences and gates around the streets you are walking. Note how each either works esthetically with their house, or does not. Ask what the homeowner might have been thinking about, and how that might say something about how they view and interact with their own neighbors. Then, go home, and look at your own gate and fence. What are YOU communicating? How would you change it? And, why?

 

Fresh lemon-aid, here, come on inside the gate!

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The Gate is Open

This project depends on you - and your photos of gates. Great gates, different gates, unusual gates, non-obvious gates. Be sure to include your contact information, permission to use your photo, and a name for proper credit where credit is due! Be a part of the Gate Project.
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